May 10, 2021

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Sea levels could rise by 13 feet if the West Antarctic ice sheet collapses


The study warned that global sea levels could rise by as much as 13 feet if the West Antarctic ice sheet collapses, a result far worse than scientists expected.

The Harvard researchers were working on another project when they realized that the West Antarctic ice sheet was producing more water than usual.

Rising global temperatures mean that there is a potential for the West Antarctic ice sheet, which extends over 750,000 cubic miles, to collapse over the next 1,000 years.

The study authors say current models suggest that melting ice will increase sea levels by 10 feet above current levels, putting many coastal areas underwater.

However, due to a process called water expulsion, in which the ice melts, the rocky layer beneath the plate will “ bounce off ”, pushing the surrounding water into the ocean, causing the global sea level to rise 3 feet above that caused by melting ice.

The study authors say current models suggest that melting ice will increase sea levels by 10 feet above current levels, putting many coastal areas underwater.

The study warned that global sea levels could rise by as much as 13 feet if the West Antarctic ice sheet collapses, a result far worse than scientists expected.

The study warned that global sea levels could rise by as much as 13 feet if the West Antarctic ice sheet collapses, a result far worse than scientists expected.

Explanation: The mechanism of expelling the water

The water expulsion mechanism is a geological process that could cause the global average sea level to rise further over the next 1,000 years.

This occurs when the solid rock rock in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet sits upward as the ice melts.

The total weight of the ice sheet decreases as the melt continues.

The rock is located below sea level, so when it rises, it pushes water from the surrounding area into the ocean.

This extra water is added to the water from melting ice, which increases the overall amount of global sea level rise.

The team expects the increase from this process to be around 3 feet, bringing the total sea level to 13 feet over the next 1,000 years.

The new forecast takes into account the effect of this geological process on top of the wider effect of the melting of ice.

The process involves moving solid rock under the sea upward as the ice sheet melts, forcing the surrounding water into the ocean.

The authors explain that this process increases the overall level of sea level rise by about three feet, more than melting ice on its own over the next 1,000 years.

Linda Pan, a doctoral student at Harvard University in the United States, said the scale of the impact “shocked us”.

The authors explained that “previous studies which considered the mechanism rejected it as illogical.”

The researchers were working on another project when they realized that the West Antarctic ice sheet was producing more water than usual.

To investigate how the water ejection mechanism affected sea levels around the world, they looked at what was happening beneath West Antarctica.

They discovered how quickly materials like bedrock flowed through the mantle, and they found that the expulsion of water was happening faster than expected.

“Regardless of the scenario we used for the collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, we always found that an additional one meter of sea level rise occurred,” Pan said.

The team explained that a total collapse of the ice sheet would add 3.3 feet to current estimates over the next 1,000 years – bringing it to 13.3 feet.

Co-author of the article, Evelyn Powell, said the collapse of the plate would lead to a global rise of 10.5 feet in sea level.

“What we showed is that the water flush mechanism will add an extra meter, or 30 percent, to the total.”

Even over the next century, the researchers say, global sea level rise will increase by 20 percent due to the mechanism of ejection of water under West Antarctica.

Due to a process called water expulsion, in which the ice melts, the rock will `` bounce '' under the plate, forcing the surrounding water into the ocean, causing the global sea level to rise 3 feet above that caused by the melting ice.

Due to a process called water expulsion, in which the ice melts, the rock will “ bounce ” under the plate, forcing the surrounding water into the ocean, causing the global sea level to rise 3 feet above that caused by the melting ice.

The team explained that a total collapse of the ice sheet would add 3.3 feet to current estimates over the next 1,000 years - bringing it to 13.3 feet.

The team explained that a total collapse of the ice sheet would add 3.3 feet to current estimates over the next 1,000 years – bringing it to 13.3 feet.

Professor Jerry Mitrovica, co-author, said all published projections of sea level rise due to melting of the West Antarctic ice sheet are based on climate modeling.

Whether the projection extends to the end of this century or longer in the future, he said, the modeling “has to be revised upwards because of their work.”

The researchers say the effect of water repellency and the lower viscosity of the mantle must be taken into account if future estimates of sea level rise are accurate.

“Sea level rise does not stop when the ice stops melting,” said Ms. Ban. “The damage we are doing to our coasts will continue for centuries.

The results have been published in the journal Science Advances.

Melting ice and ice sheets will have a ‘dramatic effect’ on global sea levels

Global sea levels could rise by 10 feet (3 meters) if the Thwaites Glacier collapsed in West Antarctica.

Sea-level rise threatens cities from Shanghai to London, to low-lying areas of Florida or Bangladesh, and to whole countries like the Maldives.

In the United Kingdom, for example, a height of 6.7 feet (2 meters) or more could place areas such as Hull, Peterborough, Portsmouth, parts of East London and the Thames Estuary at risk of inundation.

A glacier collapse, which could start by decades, could flood major cities like New York and Sydney.

Parts of New Orleans, Houston and Miami in the southern United States will be especially hard hit.

A 2014 study by the Union of Concerned Scientists looked at 52 indicators of sea level in communities across the United States.

It found that tidal floods will increase dramatically in many locations of the east coast and the Gulf, based on a conservative estimate of projected increases in sea level based on current data.

The results show that most of these communities will experience a sharp increase in the number and intensity of tidal flood events over the coming decades.

By 2030, more than half of the 52 societies are expected to experience, on average, at least 24 tidal floods annually in exposed areas, assuming moderate sea level rise projections. Twenty of these communities could see tidal flood events triple or more triple.

The Central Atlantic Coast is expected to see some of the largest increases in flood frequency. Places such as Annapolis, Maryland, and Washington, D.C. can expect more than 150 tidal floods annually, and several locations in New Jersey can experience 80 or more floods.

In the UK, two meters (6.5 feet) by 2040 will almost completely submerge large parts of Kent, according to research results published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science in November 2016.

The southern coast regions such as Portsmouth, Cambridge and Peterborough will also be severely affected.

Cities and towns around the Humber Estuary, such as Hull, Scunthorpe and Grimsby will also experience severe flooding.