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German athletes debut unitards as they condemn ‘sexualisation in gymnastics’

German gymnasts break the rules in Tokyo Olympiad debuting in a jumpsuit, denouncing the sexualization of his sport.

Throughout the tournament, teams will wear full uniforms that cover their legs and most of their body, instead of the usual sports swimwear.

Thus, athletes do not violate any rules that are allowed to wear a “one-piece swimsuit with long legs – from thigh to ankle.”

Elisabeth Seitz, Kim Bui, Pauline Schaefer and Sarah Voss showed off their outfits they wore to workout on Thursday in a photo posted to Instagram.

The image is released a few days after the Norwegian women’s beach handball team was fined for refusing to wear bikini bottoms to a match instead of competing in unregulated shorts.

German gymnasts (LR) Elisabeth Seitz, Pauline Schaefer, Kim Bui and Sara Voss debuted in jumpsuit on Thursday in a photo posted on Instagram by Ms Schaefer (pictured)

“Our podium training went very well. We were able to call our performance and introduce ourselves to the judges. Fine tuning will be done again until Sunday and then finally starts. How do you like our new outfit? ‘- wrote Schaefer on Instagram.

“Nice arena, good podium preparation, nice jumpsuits and lots of fun,” Bui also wrote.

The German Gymnastics Federation (DTB) confirmed in April that its athletes oppose “sexualization in gymnastics,” adding that the issue is important in efforts to prevent sexual violence. BBC reported at the time

The DTB announcement came after German athletes, including Foss and Bui, donned jumpsuits at the European Artistic Gymnastics Championships.

“We hope that gymnasts who are uncomfortable in regular clothes will feel the courage to follow our example,” Ms. Voss said at the time.

Speaking to the public broadcaster ZDF, she continued, “All of us women want to feel good in our skin. Artistic gymnastics gets harder and harder as you grow out of your child’s body.

“When I was a kid, I didn’t think of tight sportswear as anything more. But when puberty began, when my period began, I began to feel more and more uncomfortable. “

Pictured: Pauline Schaefer from Germany competes in August 2018 in a more traditional swimsuit used in the sport.  By not wearing swimsuits, the German team is not breaking any rules that allow for the use of a

Pictured: Pauline Schaefer from Germany competes in August 2018 in a more traditional swimsuit used in the sport. By not wearing swimsuits, the German team is not breaking any rules that allow for the use of a “one-piece swimsuit with long legs from thigh to ankle.”

An earlier post by Ms Bui said the German team wanted to “encourage all gymnasts around the world to wear this if they want to feel better!

“The gymnast should choose what she (or he) feels comfortable in! Long-leg leotards can look aesthetically pleasing too! ‘

In 2016, the gymnastics world – especially in the United States – was rocked by allegations of sexual assault against high-profile figures, including a longtime physician for the United States National Gymnastics Team (USAG). Larry Nassar

Nassar was found guilty and later sentenced to prison terms ranging from 40 to 175 years after more than 150 women opposed him in court.

This incident raised questions about the sport, namely how a man like Nasser had uncontrolled access to young girls for so long.

American gymnast Simone Biles, who acted as one of the women sexually abused by Nasser, said earlier this year that she competed in the Tokyo Olympics to speak out and give a voice to the victims of such violence.

Norway’s women’s beach handball team was fined Monday after players refused to wear bikini bottoms at a match.

The Disciplinary Committee of the European Handball Federation (EHF) fined the team € 1,500 (£ 1,300) or € 150 (£ 130) per player.

The penalty comes after they put on shorts – instead of the swimsuit trunks required by the rules of the International Handball Federation (IHF) – in their defeat for the bronze medal in the match against Spain at the European Beach Handball Championships in Bulgaria on Sunday.

The next day, Norwegian officials reacted angrily to the news.

“This is completely ridiculous,” Norway’s culture and sports minister, Abid Raja, tweeted after Monday’s ruling. “What a change in outlook is needed in the global sports world of conservative macho.”

Eirik Sordal, president of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation, told the national news agency NTB: “It shouldn’t even be a problem in 2021.”

Norway's women's beach handball team was fined Monday after players refused to wear bikini bottoms during a match, instead wearing shorts (pictured).

Norway’s women’s beach handball team was fined Monday after players refused to wear bikini bottoms during a match, instead wearing shorts (pictured).

Ahead of the sanctions, the Norwegian handball federation said on Monday that it is ready to pay a fine after the women’s team knowingly violated official rules.

“Of course, we will pay any fine,” Kare Geir Lio, president of the Norwegian Handball Federation, told AFP on Monday. “We are all in the same boat,” he added.

Norwegian handball player Katinka Haltvik, quoted by state broadcaster NRK, also said before the fine that the team would happily pay.

The team was expected to be fined just € 50 (£ 43) per player, a € 1,000 higher penalty than originally anticipated.

Clothing has long been a problem in beach sports, with some female players finding bikinis demeaning or impractical.

Although bikinis have not been compulsory for beach volleyball players since 2012, IHF rules state that “athletes must wear bikini bottoms” that must “fit snugly”, “cut off at an upward angle to the upper leg” and no more 10 centimeters.

Male players wear shorts.

Having abandoned the standard bikini bottoms, the Norwegian women's team (pictured in 2017 wearing bikini bottoms) was fined € 150 per player - a total of € 1,500.

Having abandoned the standard bikini bottoms, the Norwegian women’s team (pictured in 2017 wearing bikini bottoms) was fined € 150 per player – a total of € 1,500.

On the eve of the European Championship, Norway asked the European Handball Federation to be allowed to play in shorts, but she was told that violation of the rules is punishable by fines.

They obeyed until the last match.

“The most important thing is to have equipment that the athletes are comfortable with,” Leo said, adding that “it should be free choice within a standardized framework.”

Norway’s proposal to amend the current regulations will be discussed by the authorities in the coming months.

In contrast, earlier this year, German beach volleyball stars Karla Borger and Julia Souda said they were boycotting the tournament in Qatar, stating that it is “the only country” where players are prohibited from wearing bikinis on court.

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