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May 13, 2021

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Britain has recorded only one death from Covid and 1,649 cases


Britain recorded only one death from Covid today, the lowest death toll in nine months, while injuries have decreased to levels not seen since the beginning of September.

Statistics from the Ministry of Health showed that this was only the third time that deaths had decreased to this level, after August 3 and 30. July 30 was the only day of the epidemic that no casualties were recorded.

Health managers also recorded 1649 other cases of coronavirus, down by a fifth from 2,064 last Monday. This was the lowest number of positive tests since September 2, before the second wave spiraled out of control.

The numbers tend to be lower on Mondays because fewer people are available over the weekend to process paperwork to register a death. The separate death-date statistics, which are about two weeks late, show that about 15 Britons are still succumbing to the virus every day – similar to levels seen at the end of summer, when ministers were happy to allow the British to mix with some restrictions despite no one. vaccination.

Britain today surpassed a milestone of eliminating 50 million anti-virus vaccines, after another 250,000 doses were eliminated yesterday. About 34.6 million people have now received their first dose, and 15.4 million – or 30 percent of all adults – have been fully vaccinated.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock praised the “tremendous” achievement and insisted that we would have a “great British summer”, while Boris Johnson said he saw no reason why England’s next planned relaxation on 17 May.

Despite the successful launch of the vaccine along with reduced cases and deaths, the prime minister poured cold water on holiday hopes, warning that putting too many countries on the “green list” for travel could risk a “flow of disease”. His comments came hours after the European Union unveiled plans to allow the British fortified on summer trips.

Johnson insisted that Number 10 would be “ cautious ” amid a bitter cabinet debate over how much border controls would be eased this month. Hancock and Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty are said to be among those pushing for quarantine-free countries to be kept at an absolute minimum.

On a pre-election visit to Hartlepool this afternoon, Johnson also claimed there was a “good chance” of repealing the current social distancing rules on June 21 – touted as England’s Independence Day.

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab hinted yesterday that masks and social distancing measures will be necessary after June 21st. Today, however, the Prime Minister said he hopes that it will be possible to abolish the existing one-meter-plus rule when the nation reaches the final step on the roadmap to exit from lockdown. .

His comments came as hospitality chiefs said a return to unfettered trade was “critical” and would mean that bars, bars and restaurants can “pay off.” Relinquishing the one meter plus base would allow hospitality as well as venues like theaters to open at full capacity for the first time in more than a year.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock praised the “phenomenal” achievement, saying, “These punches save lives and help us return to normal.”

Boris Johnson pours cold water on holidays I hope he warns that the big “green list” free from quarantine starting May 17 could lead to “an influx of disease.”

Boris Johnson today poured cold water on holiday hopes, warning that putting too many countries on the “green list” for travel from May 17th could pose a risk of “disease outflow”.

The prime minister insisted that the government would be “cautious” amid a bitter debate in the cabinet over the extent to which border restrictions would be eased this month.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty are said to be among those pushing for quarantine-free countries to be kept at an absolute minimum.

But other prominent figures are urging a more flexible approach, insisting that with the outbreak in the UK under control and vaccines making strong progress, the government has no right to continue curbing freedoms.

Mr Johnson suggested that he stand by camp doves on a pre-election visit to Hartlepool this afternoon.

“We want to do some opening up on May 17, but I don’t think people in this country want to see the flow of disease from anywhere else,” he told reporters.

“I definitely don’t and we have to be very strong, and we have to be as careful as possible, while we continue to open up.”

The comments came as the European Union unveiled plans to allow fortified Britons in for the holidays.

Brussels offered hope for holidays with proposals to relax border rules for those who have had vaccines and from countries with low infection rates.

The UK’s “green list” is not expected to be revealed until Friday, leaving millions of Britons in limbo as they question whether flights will be possible.

Gibraltar and Malta may be on the list, but much of Europe and the United States may still be off limits due to fears of different strains.

In other Covid news:

  • Covid bodies are dumped in graves in India while the daughter discusses her dying mother from mouth to mouth;
  • A survey showed that outdoor vacations and nights outside the home are less important than they were before the lockdown;
  • Boris Johnson hints that all restrictions can be removed from June 21;
  • Thousands of Cambridge students challenge the COVID-19 rules of a liquor-fueled “Tsarist Sunday” to celebrate the start of the summer semester;
  • Mobility cities are experiencing a boom in demand for office space as more companies move towards flexible work after the pandemic;
  • Gyms, gyms and swimming pools have reopened and two families are allowed to meet indoors in the latest relaxation of the lockdown in Wales.

In response to the NHS’s huge numbers, Mr Hancock said: “ I want to say a big thank you to everyone who participated – of course the NHS, the scientists, armed forces and council members who helped so much, and the volunteers who brought the true spirit of this program.

It looks like Margaret Kennan was only yesterday getting the world’s first clinically approved vaccine, and now we’ve delivered 50 million vaccines.

This is very important, of course, because it is a life-saving vaccine that helps protect you, and helps protect those around you, which is our way out of this epidemic.

“Because of the vaccination program we can continue moving forward on this roadmap, and I know we are going to have a wonderful British summer.”

Boris Johnson told reporters on a visit to Hartlepool that the results of the vaccination campaign were “ already starting to show in epidemiology ” as cases remained low despite other rules being relaxed on April 12.

“As things are, the way things are, with the vaccine starting to be launched the way it is – we did 50 million hits as I’m talking to you today, a quarter of the adult population, one in four, got, he said, two punches.

In response to the vaccination tutor, NHS Saffron Cordery, executive vice president of Providers, described it as a “remarkable achievement”.

Ms Cordieri added: “ Frontline NHS staff and volunteers have done a tremendous amount of work over the past five months, administering nearly 35 million first strikes and more than 15 million second doses.

We owe immense gratitude to everyone who participated in the planning and delivery of this huge and complex program.

But while there is much to celebrate with the success of the vaccination program, we still have a long way to go before we reach the next milestone of delivering the first dose to all adults by the end of July.

We encourage everyone to get their vaccine when their vaccine is introduced and continue to follow the rules for social contact. This will help keep infection rates under control and ensure that this current lockdown is our last.

Boris Johnson indicated today that he is standing by the dove Hancock camp on overseas holidays, warning that putting too many countries on the “green list” for travel from May 17th may pose a risk of “disease outflow”.

“We want to do some opening up on May 17, but I don’t think people in this country want to see the flow of disease from anywhere else,” he told reporters.

“I definitely don’t and we have to be very strong, and we have to be as careful as possible, while we continue to open up.”

Covid infection rates across the UK in the week ending April 27, the most recent available. And health department statistics showed that nine out of ten councils saw their cases drop over the course of April. The highest infection rate was in Selby, North Yorkshire

The comments came as the European Union unveiled plans to allow fortified Britons in for the holidays.

Boris Johnson reveals that there is a “good chance” of repealing the current social distancing rules on June 21st

Boris Johnson revealed today that there is a “ good chance ” of repealing the current social distancing rules on June 21.

The prime minister said he hopes that the existing one-meter plus rule can be abolished when the nation reaches the final step in the exit roadmap for lockdown shutdowns.

His comments came as hospitality chiefs said a return to unfettered trade was “critical” and would mean that bars, bars and restaurants can “pay off.”

Relinquishing the one meter plus base would allow hospitality as well as venues like theaters to open at full capacity for the first time in more than a year.

It was reported overnight that one-way systems, screens, and wearing masks on the go could remain in place in hospitality venues after June 21 but customer numbers will not be limited.

According to The Times, audiences in theaters and movie theaters will have to wear face coverings during shows, while there will be strict guidelines on ventilation and intermittent entry.

Brussels offered hope for holidays with proposals to relax border rules for those who have had vaccines and from countries with low infection rates.

The UK’s “green list” is not expected to be revealed until Friday, leaving millions of Britons in limbo as they question whether flights will be possible.

Gibraltar and Malta may be on the list, but much of Europe and the United States may still be off limits due to fears of different strains.

Portugal is one country that could be added, as advocates say the contagion and risk of contracting the variants is now very low.

However, a group of MPs from different parties insisted that the holidays be discouraged even after they become legal within two weeks.

Official Covid figures today revealed that nearly 60 per cent of Britain will now be on the original “green list” that allows travelers to return from abroad without facing cumbersome self-isolation requirements.

Statistics from the Ministry of Health showed that 218 of the 380 councils had a coronavirus infection rate of less than 20 cases per 100,000 in the week ending April 27, the most recent rate available.

Last summer, ministers imposed arduous 14-day quarantine requirements on travelers from countries with infection rates above this level. The self-isolation period for all overseas trips has now been shortened to ten days, but holidays abroad are still banned until at least May 17.

The figures also showed that nine out of ten local authorities saw the disease’s spread diminished in April. Only Selby in North Yorkshire now has an infection rate above 100 per 100,000. For comparison, there were 23 authorities above this level at the end of March.

Experts said all numbers seemed to be “ very optimistic, ” indicating that Britain was “ over the worst ” of the pandemic and would never see the number of deaths and hospitalizations as high as in the darkest days of January due to the massive vaccination launch. To date, more than 50 million hits have been eliminated.

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