May 9, 2021

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Modern “environmental records for wood burning stoves” are more polluting than traditional firewood


Experts warn that modern “environmental records” of wood-burning stoves made of coffee, bamboo or straw actually pollute more than traditional firewood

  • Modern logs can be purchased for use on traditional wood burning stoves
  • They are made from the remnants of the plant-based commodity manufacturing process
  • It is classified as “renewable” because it is made from waste products
  • But research shows when burned that it violates new emissions regulations

According to new research, the modern “wood” used in wood burning stoves made from coffee, bamboo, wine, and more is more polluting than traditional firewood.

New laws banning the burning of charcoal and damp wood at home are set to go into effect on May 1.

But tree trunks that use leftover plant residues escaped the ban because they are considered “renewable” fuels.

According to new research, the modern “wood” used in wood burning stoves made from coffee, bamboo, wine, olives and more is more polluting than traditional firewood.

The new legal limit for smoke emissions in solid fuels is 5 grams per hour and the sulfur content is 2 percent.

But research has shown that a 100 percent olive tree has a rating of 17.6 grams per hour when burned.

Experts warn that consumers could inadvertently break the law and risk a fine of up to £ 1,000 if they burn fuel while in the smoke control zone, even though the sale of logs is legal.

Researchers found that people who load wood two or more times over the course of the session experience up to four times as much pollution as those who don't refuel throughout the evening.  Stock image

Researchers found that people who load wood two or more times over the course of the session experience up to four times as much pollution as those who don’t refuel throughout the evening. Stock image

Modern wood burners have three times the level of harmful pollution particles indoors

A study found that wood-burning stoves pose a risk to children and the elderly and should be sold with a health warning.

Researchers from the University of Sheffield placed pollution detectors in 19 homes for a month and collected data every few minutes.

The wood stoves were lit for four hours at a time, and during operation, the levels of harmful particles were three times greater than when they were lit.

These particles have been linked to a number of health issues and can cause lung damage – especially in the very young and the elderly.

All burners were “ smoke-free, ” which means they meet government standards set to become mandatory by 2022.

Commenting on the legislation, Tim Minnette, CEO of CPL Industries, a maker of smokeless fuels, said: “ The legislation is designed to improve air quality in England by reducing emissions of PM2.5 (fine particles) and SOx (sulfur oxides) that are It is popular with solid fuels used in home and garden production.

However, at the eleventh hour, many fuels were exempt from legislation based on their composition and considered renewable, rather than their performance on air quality.

While HETAS, the certifying body for fuels in the industry, has confirmed that these products will not carry a HETAS seal of approval, the fuel has not been banned and will remain available for consumers to buy.

Minnette added: “ This legislation has put a lot of emphasis on configuring fuels so that they can be classified as renewable sources but ignore major issues like air quality.

These fuels are much cheaper to produce and sell, with the fact that consumers will naturally gravitate towards cheaper products but unintentionally produce high levels of air pollution.

“Not only does the government have to look at this legislation and the exemptions in place, but it is imperative that consumers be better informed about the purchases they are making and the hidden influence.”

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