May 16, 2021

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Modern “wood” used in wood burning stoves “is more polluting than traditional firewood”


Modern “wood” for wood-burning ovens made from coffee and olive waste and wine production “pollutes more than traditional firewood”

  • Records escaping house fire laws that went into effect today are causing more pollution
  • The new legal limit for smoke emissions in solid fuels is 5 grams per hour
  • Research shows that 100 percent of olive tree stems have a rating of 17.6 grams per hour

Research shows that modern “tree trunks” used in wood burning stoves made from waste coffee and olive and wine production pollute more than traditional firewood.

New laws prohibit burning charcoal and damp wood in the home from May 1.

But records using leftover plant waste when making coffee, olive oil and wine escaped the ban because it is considered a “renewable” fuel.

The new legal limit for smoke emissions in solid fuels is 5 grams per hour and the sulfur content is 2 percent.

Records using leftover plant waste when making coffee, olive oil, and wine escaped the ban because they are considered “renewable” fuels [File photo]

But research has shown that a 100 percent olive tree has a rating of 17.6 grams per hour when burned.

Experts warn that consumers could inadvertently break the law and risk a fine of up to £ 1,000 if they burn fuel while in the smoke control zone, even though the sale of logs is legal.

Commenting on the legislation, Tim Minnette, CEO of CPL Industries, a manufacturer of smokeless fuels, said: “ The legislation is designed to improve England’s air quality by reducing emissions of PM2.5 (fine particles) and SOx (sulfur oxides) that are It is famous for its solid fuels. They are used in home and garden production.

However, at the eleventh hour, many fuels were exempt from legislation based on their composition and considered renewable, rather than their performance on air quality.

Experts warn consumers may inadvertently risk breaking the law and a fine of up to £ 1,000 if they burn fuel while in the smoke control zone, even though records are legal to sell

Experts warn consumers may inadvertently risk breaking the law and a fine of up to £ 1,000 if they burn fuel while in the smoke control zone, even though records are legal to sell

While HETAS, the certifying body for fuels in the industry, has confirmed that these products will not carry a HETAS seal of approval, the fuel has not been banned and will still be available for consumers to buy.

Minnette added: “ This legislation has focused so much on configuring fuels that they can be classified as renewable sources but ignores key issues like air quality.

These fuels are much cheaper to produce and sell, with the fact that consumers will naturally gravitate towards cheaper products but unintentionally produce high levels of air pollution. Not only does the government have to look at this legislation and the exemptions in place, but it is imperative that consumers be better informed about the purchases they make and the hidden effect.

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