May 10, 2021

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Figures show that the incidence of obesity in children treated in hospital doubled within two years


The incidence of childhood obesity treated in NHS hospitals has more than doubled in two years and has tripled since 2014.

  • The number of infants and young children treated in hospital for obesity doubled within two years
  • The catalyst for obesity in 1087 patients aged 4 years and under last year
  • The number more than tripled from 336 in 2013/2014 to 1087 in 2019/20

Figures show that the number of obese infants and young children being treated in NHS hospitals has doubled within two years.

Doctors say obesity was a contributing factor in 1,087 patients aged 4 years and under last year, 61 of whom were less than a year old.

Cases included diabetes, asthma, fatal sleep apnea and gastroesophageal reflux due to the mockery of fatty foods.

The number more than tripled from 336 in 2013/2014 to 1087 in 2019/20, the most recent year for which figures are available.

The numbers, from NHS Digital, are also double the 531 figure reported in 2017/18.

The number of obese infants and young children treated in NHS hospitals has more than doubled within two years, the figures show (stock photo)

Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, said it was “terrifying” that babies “hardly ever left the womb” were overweight.

He blamed a lack of health visitors and midwives, early weaning of high-calorie foods and weight gain on parents.

Separate figures show that 601 “Sumo Babies” were born weighing 5 kg (11 pounds) or more in the past year. The average baby weighs 7.6 pounds.

Studies have shown that overweight mothers are more likely to have larger babies, with an increased risk of complications and poor health.

“It’s a shame that young children in hospital are being treated for obesity,” said Mr. Frey.

It shows a societal failure to deal with a problem that risks stalking these children for life.

We need a complete revolution that gives young people a healthy start, even before they are born.

Parents need to get fit and eat a good diet.

Figures show that half of the women in this country are obese at pregnancy.

“ They keep eating a poor diet and passing it on to their babies, which puts them at greater risk of being born with excess weight.

Doctors say obesity was a contributing factor in 1,087 patients aged 4 years and under last year, with 61 patients less than one year old (stock image)

Doctors say obesity was a contributing factor in 1,087 patients aged 4 years and under last year, with 61 patients less than a year old (stock image)

“Unfortunately, the shortage of midwives and health visitors means that many parents are not taught the importance of healthy living.” He added: Another problem is weaning children early and giving them food that contains high calories.

If thrown into a stroller or crib, they do not exercise and cannot burn the extra weight.

“Once they start piling on the pounds, it can be difficult to lose them and this increases the risk of getting sick, as these numbers show.” Boris Johnson has pledged to be tough on obesity, with lessons in a healthy lifestyle for families struggling to stay fit.

“This data is a very disturbing snapshot of the impact of obesity on children’s health right now,” said Caroline Cerny, of the Obesity Health Alliance.

Children are growing up in an environment where budget cuts have resulted in a lack of support for new families in the critical early years period, and parents are forced to contend with a diet that tends to produce and market sugary foods.

Every child has the right to grow up in good health.

“Bold and comprehensive government action can make this a reality, from restrictions on sugar content and baby food marketing to moving forward with banning fast food ads online.”

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